February Crafternoon






Yesterday was February’s Crafternoon, you might have noticed that I skipped having one in January. It was nice to take a month off after the holidays to unwind and not think about parties.
We made little dolls out of beads, and munched on a variety of scones. I wish I had taken photos of everything everyone made, but when I am in the middle of it all I often forget to grab my camera.
They were so much fun though and I’ll post a DIY tomorrow with the people I made (I went a little nuts and made 8 of them)
For a snack I made three kinds of scones… cheddar chive scones, these were great-so moist and fluffy, I think would make excellent biscuits. Chocolate walnut espresso scones, those were just “ok” a bit too dry and not memorable enough to ever make again. But the real star and the one that everyone seemed to rave about were gluten-free white chocolate lemon almond scones. I loosely followed this recipe here but for the “gluten free flour blend” I used 2 cups of gluten free bisquick, used the zest of a whole lemon, left out the cranberries and mixed the white chips into the dough instead of melting them on top, and tossed in about 1/2 cup of almond slices. They were slightly prone to fall apart while still hot, but as they cooled they held their shape really well. We only have 3 gals who follow a GF diet, but everyone seemed to like these. Some people liked them topped with lime curd & whipped cream, but they were really good plain too. I’d make them again for sure!

October’s Crafternoon


Yesterday was the October Crafternoon, which was a favorite of mine because I love all things Halloween. Fourteen lovely ladies (and one gent) came out for a crafternoon with veggie “beef” stew, bread, and apple cider donuts….but that’s not all…


Tasha made the beautiful Halloween cupcakes & funfetti halloween cookies. Jessee made the jack-o-lantern macarons (faces drawn on with the edible food writers, perfect!) Meri made a pumpkin dip for gingersnaps, Katie made pumpkin muffins (which I ate one of before the party so that’s why there is not one on my plate), Amanda brought homemade cider, and Page made the “bloody” coconut balls. It was quite the Halloween feast! Then Lindsey & Molly each made Halloween treat bags for everyone which was so sweet, even more Halloween treats!

The project this month was to create little Halloween characters, using a combination of spun cotton, paper faces, gourds, and all sorts of other bric-a-brac I’ve been gathering up for the event. The tables were an explosion of random items that everyone turned into some of the cutest little Halloween characters I have ever seen. Of course not all of my photos turned out very well, so visit the blogs I linked above to see if anybody posts their cute creations. I’ll have a little DIY on Tuesday so you can make some of the paper faced ones for yourself. The ones I made can be seen here.

We’ve also started to do white elephant gift swaps, and that has been lots of fun! We say the gifts are to be handmade or thrifted (or a combination of the two) and range in price from $5-10. The first time we played (last month) we had people open the gifts as they picked them, and then people could steal a gift up to two times. This time we tried something different where we wait and open the gifts at the end (so you are not sure what you might be stealing). They are both fun…do you do white elephant swaps? and if so how do you play?
Costumes were welcomed, but only two lovelies dressed up. I wore my Halloween-best wearing orange and black tights, a black dress, and donning a crazy little hat I have. I got it at a thrift shop years ago, but it used to have an elastic band to keep it on your head and I never liked that. I changed it to a headband and it worked much better. I removed the feather that came on it and added ribbon and a blackbird. I also wore this fantastic Halloween corsage made by meaicp. I love it so much!
November is a busy month for me, so the next crafternoon is going to be in December, but I’m excited as Christmas is another favorite of mine!

How To Tuesday – Halloween Crates

halloween decoration I know that technically it is still Summer (first day of Fall is Sat the 22nd) but I wanted to get a jump start on my Halloween projects so the house will be decorated the entire month of October and I thought you might feel the same. Halloween is one of my favorite holidays, and I love decorating for holidays! My favorite kind of decorations are the ones you can make yourself, and the ones that are somewhat functional. These little mini crates are great for storage that is also festive. Keep them on a kitchen counter and hold your spices, put them on a a shelf and fill them with jars of Halloween candy, or put them in your bathroom to hold soap, and other bathroom essentials.
Here’s what you’ll need:
-mini wooden crates, I found these at AC Moore for $2.99 each (bring a coupon and they are even cheaper!)
-wood stain, I went with walnut
-brush
-multi-purpose spray adhesive
-labels page 1 here and page 2 here, I made 2 of each so you can put one label on each end
1. Stain all the crates and allow to dry (check your stain for dry times)
2. Have labels printed (I had my printed by Staples for a little over $1, and they print on a laser printer so you don’t have to worry about the inks smearing) cut them out.
3. Use the spray adhesive in a well ventilated area, spray the back of each label and press it onto the side of the crate. Voila…super easy, and actually pretty fast too!
Please remember these labels are for personal use only, not for re-sale.

How To Tuesday – Fabric Button Hairbands

Today’s DIY is super simple, and I think would actually make a great project for a Crafternoon. Everyone could bring fabric scraps and once you have one of the Button Kits,you can buy a few of the refills. This project is also really easy to make with kids!

The supplies are easy too..
-fabric button covering kit (they sell these at stores like Michael’s and Joannes too so you can use a coupon)
-plain hairband (the kind without the metal connector work best, but this is what I had on hand)
-pencil
-fabric scraps

The button covering kit comes with this little circle tool that helps you to line up your design. You put the tool on the fabric and the opening in the middle shows you what will show on the actual finished button. This makes it great for picking cute elements from your fabric to feature. Then trace around the outer edge with a pencil for your cut line, and cut out the circle.

Lay your fabric face down into the plastic button maker that comes with the kit. Then push the flat circle disc into the circle (smooth side down) This forms the front of your button. Tuck all your ends of the fabric in.

Put on the button back with the hook facing up, and use the blue tool to push it down into the button front. You will feel a snap as it locks into place. You can then remove your button from the button maker and your button is done! It’s so easy and fast!

Now insert your hairband into the loop on the back, and bring the loop over the entire button to secure. If you have trouble feeding the hair band into the loop you can use tweezers to grab it, but mine went through pretty easily. You can leave your hairband this way for just one decorative band. Or you can add a second button.

You add the second button the same way, and bring the hair band around the button to secure. Now when you go to tie your hair up, you just hook one button around another to secure.

How To Tuesday – Vintage Tennis Racquet Cork board

7346946228_396e572969_b

I got this vintage tennis racquet in a box of other thrifted goodies that I was buying and I wasn’t sure what I was going to do with it. It is super cute, and I could of just hung it on the wall..but I decided to turn it into a simple cork board, here’s how.

DSC_0045

You’ll need:
-tennis racquet
-paper & pencil
-cork
-scissors
-black marker
-Glaziar Push Points or glue gun

DSC_0053

First lay a sheet of paper under your tennis racquet and use the pencil to draw a dotted cutting line by going in between the string.

DSC_0058

Cut out your paper template and make sure it fits pretty snugly into the frame of your tennis racquet. Then trace the template onto your cork using a black marker. Cut the cork out with scissors.

DSC_0059

Fit cork into the back of your racquet and push a few of the glazier push points around the inside edge to hold the cork snugly against the string of the racquet. This way when you turn it over to hang it, it will still be easy to use the cork with push pins, but the strings of the racquet still show. If you don’t have push points on hand you can also use a thick ring around the outer edge of glue from a glue gun, however this would be much harder to remove if you ever decided to use the racquet for a different project.

DSC_0063

Want even more ideas for old tennis racquets? How about…
-Turn a vintage tennis racquet into a mirror
-or turn a vintage tennis racquet into a jewelry display
-Add a thread heart to a badminton racquet